Scott Kranz
Banner - The Alpine Pages Blog (final).png

Recent

Exploring Banff by Night

I recently traveled to Alberta, Canada for the very first time. My goal was to explore as much of the Banff area as possible within the few days that I had, both by day and by night. I lucked out with clear skies nearly every single day, a night photographer's dream around the time of new moon, when the stars are at their brightest and the Milky Way pops in the night sky. At this time of year, the Milky Way's core is best seen around 2:30 or 3 a.m. in the morning. That said, I lost plenty of sleep capturing images of our galaxy at ungodly hours in the night. Here is a collection of my favorite night images from my travels in Banff.

The Milky Way's core hovers above Vermilion Lakes, as I stand at the end of a dock, gazing up into the sky, admiring shooting stars and the vastness of space.

The Milky Way's core hovers above Vermilion Lakes, as I stand at the end of a dock, gazing up into the sky, admiring shooting stars and the vastness of space.

I soak my feet in the ice-cold waters of Two Jack Lake and take in the view of the Milky Way perched above Mount Rundle, one of Banff's most classic views.

I soak my feet in the ice-cold waters of Two Jack Lake and take in the view of the Milky Way perched above Mount Rundle, one of Banff's most classic views.

A composite image of a frozen Moraine Lake, with one image making up the star-trail-filled sky, and a second making up the foreground with yours truly standing still on the lake's sheet of ice.

A composite image of a frozen Moraine Lake, with one image making up the star-trail-filled sky, and a second making up the foreground with yours truly standing still on the lake's sheet of ice.

If you have any questions about traveling in Banff or night photography, please ask away in a comment below! Cheers!

-Scott